Area of zoo
Asia
Enclosure status
Temporarily closed
IUCN status
Endangered
Scientific name
Panthera tigris altaica
Order
Carnivora
Type
Mammals
Family
Felidae
Region
Russia, northern China and Korea
Habitat
Forest and mountains

 Amur tiger facts

  • Amur tigers are the largest of the world’s big cats, as well as the heaviest. 

  • Amur tigers live alone in the wild and use scent marking to keep other tigers away. 

  • Female tigers will have litters of between two and six cubs. 

  • Amur tigers are thought to be the palest tiger subspecies and can reach up to 250kg and three metres in length!  

  • By the 1940s, fewer than 40 Amur tigers were thought to remain in the wild. The Amur subspecies was saved from extinction when Russia became the first country in the world to grant its resident tigers full conservation protection.  

Where are the tigers at Whipsnade Zoo?

Our Amur tiger Czar is currently in a habitat behind the scenes at the Zoo, while we make some exciting new upgrades to his habitat home. This includes new platforms for him to climb, and two zip lines for his food so he can chase and pounce on his meals. Make sure you come and visit Czar for the February half term holidays, when he's back exploring and enjoying these exciting new features.  

What do Amur tigers look like?

Amur tigers have distinctive orange and black stripes and is the largest of the subspecies of tiger. Due to its habitat, it has a long coat of fur and a large ruff around its jawline.

What do Amur tigers eat?

Amur tigers are meat eaters, often found hunting deer, wild pigs, moose, hares and other animals that live in their habitat. 

Amur tiger habitat  

Originating in Russia, northern China and Korea, the Amur tiger lives among dense forest and mountains. These parts of the world experience long winters so the species can often be found against a backdrop of deep snow. 

Makari an Amur tiger at Whipsnade Zoo
An Amur tiger at Whipsnade Zoo

What threats do Amur tigers face? 

Hunting and deforestation.

How is ZSL helping Amur tigers?

We're working to protect Amur tigers in the wild, using camera traps to track poaching on tigers, and by building relationships with people to increase the awareness of protecting these fantastic animals. 

Tiger cubs at the Zoo

Tiger cubs were born in the Zoo in 2018 after 108 days of pregnancy. One of these cubs is still at the Zoo today and is now all grown up. After successfully breeding, parents Naya and Botzman have moved to other Zoos as part of the European Endangered Species Programme to help continue to secure a future for their species. 

Meet the Tigers

Get up close and feed one of the world's most renowned big cats, the Amur tiger, with a special Meet the Tigers experience.

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